To Twitter or Not to Twitter: This Is the (Fourth Time Through the) Question.

twitter_bird_deadThe first time,  in 2007, I had my hands full the with blog.

The second time, around 2010, I became so swamped by attempting to follow everyone’s feed with a Jane Austen level of correspondence that I chucked the account in disgust.

In 2011, my first tweet was “I’m going to regret this,” and then I left something like 48 hours later.

Not a Luddite, no. So not. In fact, if I force myself to be honest, kicking Twitter was one of the means of managing the hypnotic pull social media has on many writing-minded folks, in general, and me, in particular.

But now, with the implosion of Google Reader imminent (and yes, this is how I will write and link about this event from now on) I’m considering it. Again.

Jered, in the comments on “Diamond in the Rough,” kindly offered up that Twitter is going to serve as his de facto feed for awhile. Other crowdsourcing recommends Feedly.

What do you think?

Hurry, Star Blazers! You and the Argo have only 8 days left!

 

5 thoughts on “To Twitter or Not to Twitter: This Is the (Fourth Time Through the) Question.

  1. Dina, I know how you’re feeling. Here’s my advice:
    1. Don’t approach social media as a to-do list. You can’t read everything, so don’t try. Approach Twitter as an ever-flowing river. Dive in and swim around in the flow when you can, and accept that when you pull yourself out, other stuff is going to happen that you’re going to miss. Also: prune your follow list appropriately.
    2. If you want a replacement to Google Reader, consider http://www.newsblur.com/. That’s what I’ll be using, at least to start out. The demise of Google reader brought about a flurry of development out here in the Bay Area to fill the void, and there are some good looking new players in the market.

  2. I would, of course, love you to come back to Twitter but only for entirely selfish reasons. However, Twitter is definitely not Reader. As far as I know most of us are just wandering around assuming something good will emerge. For now I have loaded all my feeds into The Old Reader because it recreates GReader and I’m a creature of habit.

  3. My suggestion is to think of twitter and facebook as your feeds — Where your blog is published. Folks can also use Feedly or other RSS readers to consume blogs. Social Media needs to be seen as a stream that you can step into and step out of. We all have times we want to engage and those when we just don’t have time. We can’t be responsible for keeping up with ever last post on any social media site…

    I love what Seth Godin says about Facebook and Twitter on this program: http://www.onbeing.org/program/seth-godin-art-noticing-and-then-creating/transcript/5004#main_content — Just search for the word twitter to see his comments. In an nut shell, do what challenges you and helps you grow the most. Don’t worry about social media if it’s not helping you grow. With tech, you can still be there!

    Hope this helps.

  4. +1 on Jason’s sentiment. I never liked the idea of Twitter serving as an RSS reader replacement. A supplement, sure, but I want to determine which blogs/articles I read regularly.

    I transferred to Feedly and have been using it since shortly after the GReader announcement. In that time, they’ve made some UI tweaks to allow you to replicate more of Reader’s look (which I’ve done) and moved all their feeds to their own servers (they used to use GReader’s). They are now as independent a service as GReader was, and I’ve really liked the Feedly experience, both on my computer and on my Android phone (where I do most of my feed reading).

    I would eventually like to move away from a third-party service completely and roll my own RSS reader on my own hosting using TinyTinyRSS, but that’ll have to wait til I have a little more free time.

  5. People won’t think I’m a jerk because I tweet and don’t follow anybody, for example? This is how my minister husband handles Twitter, but again, the Jane Austen in me feels like this is like people sending handwritten notes to me and me giving them… NOTHING. Perhaps I am simply transferring anachronistic cultural modes onto modern communication. Maybe I am a Luddite. WAH.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>